Tag Archives: marrying-in

A genial tale of self-assertion by an Okinawan house-husband

Most of the fiction from Okinawa I have read deals either with relations with US military personnel or with discrimination against Okinawans by Japanese from the northern archipelago. “Fortunes by the Sea” (Kahô wa umi kara), the 1998 novella by Eiki Matayoshi, the 1995 winner of the Akutagawa Prize has an entirely intraethnic focus. The protagonist Kazuhisa is a fifth son who is married out, that is takes on the patronym of his wife and is responsible with carrying on the line of his wife(‘s father).

As on Taiwan, there is something humiliating about being annexed by another lineage. This is exacerbated in Kazuhisa’s case in that despite the substantial income the family receives from renting land to the US, both his wife and her father continue to work, while Kazuhisa, a college graduate, performs domestic labor (cooking, laundry) and is a literal lay-about, dreaming under an oracle tree.

He takes to going fishing after his wife and father are asleep and meets a pair of sisters from the Okinawan mainland. They run a tavern and are professionals at drawing out and making men comfortable. Their pleasant encounter (consuming a taman [snakehead] he caught) inspires him to go visit them. Having no money beyond the household allowance doled out to him and for which he must account, he decides to steal a goat to take and exchange for drinks.

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He is prone to seasickness, so the voyage across the straits is a major undertaking beyond his theft and staying out all night. The expedition surprises his father-in-law and increases Kazuhisa’s status at home. Whether he will sire an heir on his skititsh, sex-phobic wife (who arranges to spend every night at meetings of voluntary associations, some of which she heads) remains to be seen at the end of the genial, mock-heroic tale.

The translation by David Fahy occupies the last 71 pages of Southern Exposure: Modern Japanese Literature from Okinawa.

 

©2017, Stephen O. Murray

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